A Year of June

A year ago we got our fifth wheel June and married her with our Ram 3500 truck Bertha.

And it’s been an amazing match!

In that time, she has been towed through 20 different states and has been camped in 17 different locations in 9 states. In all, she has been towed more than 9,000 miles already!

We have made a few small modifications to her during this time as well.

The first thing we did was upgrade the tires and rims! RV tires are poorly made, and RV rims barely support the GVWR of the RV they are put on to. On our last rig we experienced a blowout and another time the tread split but was caught before we got on any highways. Each were traditional trailer tires. Stay away from RV tires! Period! This time we went with truck tires, specifically Goodyear G614 RST. They are unisteel, regrooveable, American-made truck tires. And in all the miles we’ve traveled and all the temperature and terrain variations we been through so far we’ve not had the first blowout, bulge, or tread issue whatsoever. We also upgraded from 13-inch trailer rims to 14-inch aluminum truck rims. Now we know our rims will be able to handle the weight of our rig and any rough roads we may encounter.

Inside, the first items changed were a couple of interior doors. We removed the solid doors that lead into the boys’ bunkhouse room and their half bathroom and replaced them with lightweight accordion doors. Doing this allows us to now utilize their bedroom and bathroom even when we are boondocked or the slideouts are in. It was a very inexpensive modification too, running less than $40 for both doors (purchased less expensive at a hardware store but also available online for convenience).

Then we added a chain hotel lock and alarm to the boys’ back door, which is on the opposing side of the rig and, despite that we love having two entrances/exits, we were concerned for the safety and security of our sons. Stock RV door locks are universal, meaning there are only a couple of handfuls of key-and-lock combinations for RV doors and locks and the chance that the neighbor in the campsite next to us could use their own key to unlock our RV door is very possible.

On that note, we also swapped out the lock and handle on the main entrance of June. We found a set of universal RV locks by RVLock that is keyed and has a numeric keypad. The deadbolt can be locked/unlocked with a key, personalized 4- to 8-digit code, or remote fob (choice of the user) and the handle can be locked/unlocked with the provided key. This is not a stock lock, so the likelihood that anyone in any campground being able to use their key to open our door is slim to none. This was not an inexpensive upgrade, but it’s more than worth the $250 we spent on it (and it’s gone down in price since then!).

Papa worked (and will work) out of the rig, but the builtin desktop in the master bedroom wasn’t large enough for what he needed. So we installed an Ikea wall-mounted drop-leaf tabletop/desktop on the wall across from the foot of the bed. When it is folded down it doesn’t obstruct the walking space in the bedroom at all. When it is propped up, Papa sits at a chair at the foot of the bed and is able to comfortably do his work in the quiet privacy of the master bedroom. This has worked out so well!

Possibly Mama’s favorite addition to our RVing lifestyle are the washer and dryer that we’ve purchased. This is our first RV with a space and hookup for a washing machine and/or dryer. However, full RV washers, dryers, and washer/dryer combos are extremely heavy and expensive. After a lot of research, we decided to save a lot of weight and money and go with the compact Manatee washing machine with pump and spin-dry, as well as the Tidalpool portable UV clothes dryer. This setup has saved us so much time and money!

The washing machine is very lightweight and works remarkably well. When we first started using it we set it up next to the kitchen sink in the galley, so there was a water source and a way to drain the water from the tubs, and only stored it in the closet intended for a washing machine when we were traveling. Then papa was able to set it up so the washer actually stays in the closet with the washing machine hookups, where there are cold and hot water spigots and a location for draining. Clothes — everything from delicates and shirts to linens and snow suits — are washed in the tub on the left. The water is then drained and the clothes are relocated to the spin-dry tub on the right. In this tub we rinse the clothes, spin it again with either liquid laundry detergent or distilled white vinegar, and then spin-rinse/dry again. The tub doesn’t dry completely, but it is so powerful that the clothes are barely damp and then dry quickly.

The dryer folds up and packs away into a duffel bag. When it’s assembled it stands tall and the clothes are hung on it to dry. When the clothes are hung up then a bag is placed around them and the unit is turned on to the desired length of drying time. A full load of clothes can dry in 1- to 1.5-hours, depending on the thickness of the material of the clothes, and the final half-hour of the drying cycle is when the UV lamp kicks on, which then sanitizes the clothes. We have used it set up in the galley, under a vent in the roof (to our surprise, it didn’t heat up the rig!), but we have also set it up outside, between the main entrance and the exterior wall of the boys’ bunkhouse slideout.

Could we simply use laundry rooms at campgrounds? Sure…if they’re provided or available. However, a full day can easily be used up that way too, and it’s not at all sanitary. You can’t just leave the clothes in the laundry room, so you would need to stick around and wait for the loads to be finished, so you are there when they’re finished and other people don’t walk off with anything. The dryers don’t heat up enough to kill off germs, so viral and fecal germs from the clothes of others can and will end up on  your own clothes! And let’s face it, laundromats — whether they’re elsewhere or at campgrounds — are pricey and it adds up quickly. With our setup, we can wash and dry in our own RV, without concern, and we save a ton of money: we paid less than $300 for both units, combined they weight less than 35 pounds, and convenience just goes without saying.

Another modification we made to June is the spare-tire location. By default the spare-tire carrier was located on the back bumper of the RV. However, we use the bumper for carrying our family’s bicycles. On our previous rig (the Coach) we had installed a spare-tire carrier that attaches to the frame of the rig and is located under the belly. A few months ago we finally installed this on June. Up until then, we kept the spare tire in the huge pass-through of June, but that took up so much space that could have otherwise been used for tools, camping supplies, and items for the boys. Now we have more space in our pass-through and the spare tire is conveniently located under the rig. We’ve also put our portable waste tank on the carrier as well.

Overall, the best interior modification we’ve made to the rig is extending the depth of the boys’ top bunk. Most bunk beds in RVs are narrower than twin beds. The bottom bunk is twin size, but the top bunk is narrower. The top is narrower than the bottom so the person on the bottom bunk doesn’t risk bumping his head on the top bunk. However, that was not a concern for us. Rather, we needed two twin-size bunks for the comfort of our boys. So Papa built an extension on the top bunk and then built a small ladder to the top bunk and a short railing along the edge. Now both boys have comfortable twin beds…and neither are stuck with a bed too narrow to sleep well.

Once we sell our house and move in to June, we know there will be other things we’ll do. However, June is and has been the perfect full-time fit for us. We can live, play, work, sleep, eat, and entertain very comfortably inside, but it’s not so big and comfortable that we don’t spend ample time outdoors. We now experience more quality family time as well.

And that’s the goal for us.

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