Three Months Later…

It’s been three months since Mama ‘Skiy’s pacemaker implant, and she hasn’t felt this well in years!

She is often asked not only how she feels physically but how she also feels about it emotionally.

First and foremost, she and Papa were terrified at the idea of her getting a pacemaker, and the decision was not an easy one to make or something we took lightly. After all, pacemakers are typically something people need well beyond fifty or sixty years old, right?!

Apparently not.

One of our nieces had heart problems from birth. She’d had multiple surgeries and several heart attacks. Sadly, just a few years ago, she had one heart attack that turned out to be fatal.

And she was a young mother.

So it actually knows no age. Something can go wrong with any part of the body at any time, at any age, and for no apparent reason. Regardless if the individual is a newborn or just two months shy of turning 37.

No medically-necessary surgery is one that’s desired, but sometimes that’s the only solution. We asked if Mama could simply go on medication, change her diet, or do something to correct the problem or help prevent the issue from happening again. There was nothing that could be done except the pacemaker implant.

Still, leading up to the minutes before her surgery, we were constantly reminded what a mistake we were making, how her life would forever be limited, that there had to be another hidden problem and the doctors didn’t know what they were doing because all they are interested in is making money.

There are still some that don’t seem to understand this was probably the most difficult decision we’ve ever had to make. In no way was it easy, and in no way did we take it lightly.

Believe us: our cardiologist tested for every imaginable and unimaginable possibility. Every.Single.One. And he even consulted another cardiologist, listened to the concerns and advice of a family friend that also happens to be a surgeon, and really did everything he could to try to make it so Mama didn’t need a pacemaker.

But an easier solution just wasn’t in the cards.

Yet we still receive negative comments and criticism regarding the choice we made, but none of that matters to us.

Mama is still here, Mama has healed, and Mama feels better than she has in a long time.

Case in point: she loves thrill rides and roller coasters, but before the pacemaker implant she stopped going on certain rides because so much anticipation would build that her heart rate would increase and she couldn’t breathe. Just a couple of weeks ago she managed to go on two of those rides, for the first time in years, and when she got off she was ready to go again!

And let’s not forget about those horrible and painful heart palpitations…now gone.

The pacemaker has leads that attaches to two chambers in her heart and will emit an impulse if her heart’s natural pacemaker hasn’t done its job. An added bonus is that the pacemaker helps her heart rate increase a little during times of exertion or excitement.

So tell us again, how was this a mistake?

Oh, the scar? We love tattoos, and scars are tattoos with better stories. The story of our little titanium friend TJ is pretty freaking great.

All those limitations? Well, to be quite honest, she in no way has any desire to compete in Mixed Martial Arts, lift over her head the equivalent of her own body weight or more, or hug a huge magnet. Seeing how those are her only limitations, we’re pretty sure she’ll live her life her way.

And what about the battery life? Well, yeah, that part sucks. It could be as soon as eight years and as long as 14 years, but she will need regular precedures to replace the pacemaker and leads. Those batteries last a long time, but it’s also the technology in the device that also needs upgraded. The leads attaching the pacemaker to her heart will wear and go bad over time, so those will need to be replaced as well. Ultimately, though, we’ll cross that bridge when we come to it, followed by the month or so of recovery.

By the way, that’s another reason her cardiologist wasn’t crazy about giving Mama a pacemaker: at 37 years old, that’s a lot of pacemaker replacement procedures to go through during her lifetime.

We’re not going to worry or think about that right now, however.

After multiple ER visits, dozens of scans and tests, and years of fearing something was truly wrong with her and not understanding why no doctor could help, we finally feel like we’ve found both the problem and the solution. It’s not what we wanted, but at least we finally got an answer and a fix.

And no, we have no way of knowing for certain if Mama’s heart would have restarted on its own in the ER or if such a pause could have led to cardiac arrest…or worse. This pacemaker will prevent that pause from happening again, which it likely would. The last thing we want or need is for her heart to stop while she’s driving or while we’re off gallivanting in some evergreen forest or snow-covered woods again.

It’s too bad if her pacemaker or scar bothers anybody else. We couldn’t care less.

Mama got a new lease on life three months ago, and her heart won’t stop like that again.

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