What If “One Day” Never Comes

Mama and Papa aren’t what-if people and never have been. We don’t want to get to an advanced age only to look back and wish we could’ve, should’ve, or would’ve done something differently.

We also see no benefit in putting off for tomorrow what can be done today.

Or putting off for next month.

Or putting off for next year.

Or putting off until retirement.

We believe planning has its place and we do so when and where appropriate.

There are things we’ve said we’ll do “when we retire” or “when the boys have grown.”

Then in January we had a rude wakeup call when Mama went to the ER and almost didn’t come home.

Now we see no point in waiting, namely for one thing in particular.

And we have decided to finally make the announcement public, after talking about this for years and putting our plan into action for months.

Folks, we’re in the process of purging and downsizing…in preparation for selling our house.

Until now only Mama and Papa’s parents and very few friends and family knew of our plans and that we’d been working on making it happen.

But today — May 1st — we’re ready to let everybody know that we will soon be listing our house on the market after we get some work done on the front and back yards. We’ve already started on the inside.

Oh, and we’re not buying another house for one to two years.

Yup, we’ve decided to go for it and get a little crazy. We’re going to live in our beloved fifth wheel June and our address will be that of whatever campground we’re parked at.

When we went on that three-month road trip last year, no one in our family wanted to come home. We can honestly say we only missed our friends and family, but we didn’t really miss our home.

Yes, there’s stability, familiarity, and monotony in living in a house. Yes, living out of our RV is risky, unusual, and unexpected.

That’s exactly why we all want to do this, and that includes our boys.

They loved not knowing what our new yard and their new playground would be like every time we parked at another campground.

They loved the small quarters of our RV and how close we all became, after we didn’t before know we could grow any closer than we already were.

They loved that they were outside more frequently and that we all went on more adventures.

They loved making new friends in each state and that age and education barriers pretty much vanished.

And since they’re already being homeschooled, the transition will be that much easier and smoother.

Yes, Papa will continue working and for the very company he’s been with and loved for more than 10 years now. We have no intentions to leave the area anytime soon, and we have plenty of camping options throughout this county and those counties nearby. Besides, as much as we travel on weekends anyway, why not simply bring our house along every time?

Our sticks-and-bricks (or S&B) home holds countless memories, and ours was the first family to live in it. This is the first house our boys ever knew, and it was also the location of the only school they’ve ever been to. It will be emotional when we do drive out of our driveway for the last time, and it’s been somewhat emotional as we box up stuff and sell and donate things that helped make our house a home.

But it is just “stuff.” They’re material things, most of which can be replaced down the road. Things that hold sentimental value and that we feel are irreplaceable will be in storage until we decide to settle down once again.

Then there are our amazing neighbors, which are also our friends. We love them dearly and we know we could never again find neighbors as wonderful as they are. Fortunately, we also know that we’ll remain in touch and friends, regardless of where we live.

And whoever moves into our house next will be extremely blessed to have them.

In addition to this being another adventure for us, this is also an opportunity to pay off everything and free ourself from debts. We will be able to save money and could potentially pay cash when we do buy or build a house down the road.

Mama loves poetry and one of her favorites is by Robert Frost, in which he concluded:

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I — I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.

And then there’s a quote by Mark Twain, popular especially among RVers:

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

Those by Frost and Twain are excellent advice and have guided Mama and Papa well for more than 15 years.

All four of us want to do this, and Mama and Papa used to say we would do this one day, perhaps in about 15 years or so.

Then we realized “one day” may never come.

Certainly Beats the Classroom

This just never gets old.

Yesterday there was a teaser on TV regarding the NHL team St. Louis Blues, which is one of the teams in the 2017 NHL playoffs. (If you didn’t already know, we’re die-hard hockey fans.)

During the teaser, the boys saw the St. Louis Arch. They got so excited and started yelling: “That’s the St. Louis Arch! We saw that! We drove right by it!” Indeed, this past September we did drive right by it on the way to Mississippi from Illinois.

We can’t even tell you how often they’ve made comments like this, positively thrilled that they saw, experienced, and learned about things in person, not merely from books. We’re not saying they haven’t learned about things from books or the Internet, but what they remember, what they talk about, what gets them super excited, are the things they have actually seen, been to, and done.

Our boys can say they’ve been to the top of a lighthouse because they’ve climbed the 203 steps to the top of the Ponce de Leon Inlet Lighthouse in Florida.

Our boys can say they’ve seen hundreds of huge windmills because we drove by and between them in states like Indiana, Ohio, Nebraska, and more.

Our boys can say they’ve played in the snow while a young moose walked by only feet away and watched two bull moose fight in Alaska.

Our boys can say they’ve been to the top of the Space Needle and looked out over Seattle, with Mount Rainier and the Olympic Mountains as the backdrop, in Washington.

And yes, the boys saw the St. Louis Arch glistening in the setting sun in Missouri.

Already they’ve stayed at least a week in each Alaska, Washington, Colorado, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Virginia, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Puerto Rico, and D ‘Skiy has been to New Mexico, although he was only one year old at the time and doesn’t remember it except for the pictures.

(And then there’s our home state of Florida, of course.)

The boys have camped in the sweltering heat of the Florida Keys and the snow-covered hills of Maggie Valley, North Carolina.

They have been on steam engine and diesel engine trains, climbed many rock walls, rode on wave runners, took on several ropes courses, snorkeled crystal-clear waters, canoed and kayaked, fished in both salt and fresh water, walked dozens upon dozens of trails, and splashed in freezing mountain streams.

They’ve been to many gardens, zoos, museums, science centers, historical landmarks, and amusement parks throughout the country and the Caribbean.

The beauty of it is that they’re still so young, and they still get so excited whenever we go someplace new, enter a state we’ve never been to before, and pack for any adventure, whether we’ve done it ten times or this is the first.

That’s part of the beauty of homeschooling. The world is their classroom and everything is an open book.

And it never gets old when they can point to something on TV or in a book and say, “I’ve been there.”

Three Months Later…

It’s been three months since Mama ‘Skiy’s pacemaker implant, and she hasn’t felt this well in years!

She is often asked not only how she feels physically but how she also feels about it emotionally.

First and foremost, she and Papa were terrified at the idea of her getting a pacemaker, and the decision was not an easy one to make or something we took lightly. After all, pacemakers are typically something people need well beyond fifty or sixty years old, right?!

Apparently not.

One of our nieces had heart problems from birth. She’d had multiple surgeries and several heart attacks. Sadly, just a few years ago, she had one heart attack that turned out to be fatal.

And she was a young mother.

So it actually knows no age. Something can go wrong with any part of the body at any time, at any age, and for no apparent reason. Regardless if the individual is a newborn or just two months shy of turning 37.

No medically-necessary surgery is one that’s desired, but sometimes that’s the only solution. We asked if Mama could simply go on medication, change her diet, or do something to correct the problem or help prevent the issue from happening again. There was nothing that could be done except the pacemaker implant.

Still, leading up to the minutes before her surgery, we were constantly reminded what a mistake we were making, how her life would forever be limited, that there had to be another hidden problem and the doctors didn’t know what they were doing because all they are interested in is making money.

There are still some that don’t seem to understand this was probably the most difficult decision we’ve ever had to make. In no way was it easy, and in no way did we take it lightly.

Believe us: our cardiologist tested for every imaginable and unimaginable possibility. Every.Single.One. And he even consulted another cardiologist, listened to the concerns and advice of a family friend that also happens to be a surgeon, and really did everything he could to try to make it so Mama didn’t need a pacemaker.

But an easier solution just wasn’t in the cards.

Yet we still receive negative comments and criticism regarding the choice we made, but none of that matters to us.

Mama is still here, Mama has healed, and Mama feels better than she has in a long time.

Case in point: she loves thrill rides and roller coasters, but before the pacemaker implant she stopped going on certain rides because so much anticipation would build that her heart rate would increase and she couldn’t breathe. Just a couple of weeks ago she managed to go on two of those rides, for the first time in years, and when she got off she was ready to go again!

And let’s not forget about those horrible and painful heart palpitations…now gone.

The pacemaker has leads that attaches to two chambers in her heart and will emit an impulse if her heart’s natural pacemaker hasn’t done its job. An added bonus is that the pacemaker helps her heart rate increase a little during times of exertion or excitement.

So tell us again, how was this a mistake?

Oh, the scar? We love tattoos, and scars are tattoos with better stories. The story of our little titanium friend TJ is pretty freaking great.

All those limitations? Well, to be quite honest, she in no way has any desire to compete in Mixed Martial Arts, lift over her head the equivalent of her own body weight or more, or hug a huge magnet. Seeing how those are her only limitations, we’re pretty sure she’ll live her life her way.

And what about the battery life? Well, yeah, that part sucks. It could be as soon as eight years and as long as 14 years, but she will need regular precedures to replace the pacemaker and leads. Those batteries last a long time, but it’s also the technology in the device that also needs upgraded. The leads attaching the pacemaker to her heart will wear and go bad over time, so those will need to be replaced as well. Ultimately, though, we’ll cross that bridge when we come to it, followed by the month or so of recovery.

By the way, that’s another reason her cardiologist wasn’t crazy about giving Mama a pacemaker: at 37 years old, that’s a lot of pacemaker replacement procedures to go through during her lifetime.

We’re not going to worry or think about that right now, however.

After multiple ER visits, dozens of scans and tests, and years of fearing something was truly wrong with her and not understanding why no doctor could help, we finally feel like we’ve found both the problem and the solution. It’s not what we wanted, but at least we finally got an answer and a fix.

And no, we have no way of knowing for certain if Mama’s heart would have restarted on its own in the ER or if such a pause could have led to cardiac arrest…or worse. This pacemaker will prevent that pause from happening again, which it likely would. The last thing we want or need is for her heart to stop while she’s driving or while we’re off gallivanting in some evergreen forest or snow-covered woods again.

It’s too bad if her pacemaker or scar bothers anybody else. We couldn’t care less.

Mama got a new lease on life three months ago, and her heart won’t stop like that again.

Disney Magic

When someone thinks “Florida,” they will simultaneously also think about beaches and Disney.

Well, this year we decided to get annual passes for the Disney theme parks again. Our boys are nearly two years older than when we had passes previously, which meant they could ride more rides…especially M ‘Skiy.

This particular birthday held extra significance for Mama though: she had received a pacemaker just two months ago.

Suddenly birthdays — even as an adult — seemed more important to celebrate.

Papa decided to surprise Mama with a weekend stay at the Disney All-Star Resort hotel, which we’ve been to before with family, and it worked out because Mama’s birthday fell on a Friday (March 10). This was also the most-affordable of the Disney hotels. We’re not fans of hotels at all, and we usually stay at the Fort Wilderness campground, but Disney’s hotels have been nicer and better than typical hotels.

So after Papa finished working for the day, we decided to head to Orlando. We were able to select some FastPasses at Magic Kingdom, though, so instead of heading straight to the hotel we decided to go to the park first.

On the way to Magic Kingdom, Mama did online checkin for the hotel, seeing how we would arrive late.

At the park, we started hitting the rides we had passes for. On the way to the third and final ride — Space Mountain — the fireworks show at the castle was about to begin, so we grabbed some food and decided to watch the show before heading to Tommorowland.

Halfway through the show, Papa’s cell phone rang. One look at the number on the caller ID and we knew it was the reservations center for Disney. We were worried we’d somehow messed up the online checkin, the reservation itself, or something else that was sure to put a damper on the weekend.

When Papa finally got off the phone, he didn’t look at all upset. Mama had tried to listen to his side of the conversation, but with the fireworks and music going on in the background all she ever heard was, “What’s the catch?”

She inquired about the call, but he said he’d explain after the show and not to worry.

The show ended and we started weaving our way through the crowd towards Space Mountain. Mama asked again about the phone call. Papa said it was Disney and they were calling because they “had extra magic to share” and wanted to upgrade our hotel reservation.

No, not to a bigger room or suite at the All-Star Resort.

Disney upgraded us to a Savannah-view room at the Animal Kingdom Lodge!!

Mama’s knees buckled as she let out a scream and her eyes filled with happy tears!

We’ve always wanted to go to that resort! But it’s one of the — if not, the — most-expensive resorts Disney has, ranging from $400-$600 per night! So we knew we’d never stay there…unless, by some chance, we managed to win the lottery.

Just like that! Out of the blue, Disney upgraded us!! And at no additional charge whatsoever! This wasn’t an effort for us to attend a talk about their vacation club or some timeshare. It was a simple upgrade, with no strings attached!

Was it because it was Mama’s birthday? Did they somehow find out her family had nearly lost her just two months prior and wanted to put a smile on their faces?! Was it entirely random and we did, in some way, just win a lottery?!

We’ll never know.

However, that was the most-incredible resort or hotel experience we’d ever had. Our room had a view of the Savannah, where we saw storks, zebras, and giraffes from our balcony. The boys even got to see their favorite animal from only feet away: the okapi. There are two amazing swimming pools and a great playground for the kids. And an added bonus was the kid’s club, where Mama and Papa were able to take the boys for a couple of hours while they went on their first date in more than 2 years, all while the boys played with other kids and had a pizza dinner under the watch and care of Disney staff.

The weekend was perfect. We were all together, enjoying amazing weather, at a hotel we’d only dreamed of going to, and for the entire weekend it cost us less than it would have otherwise for only a single night.

Thank you, Disney, for sharing the magic and making our dreams come true!

Hiccup of the Heart

And just like that, our new year was off to a rough start…

Mama ‘Skiy has been been considered a poster child of health. She’s always been active, she doesn’t let things get to her, and she always has a positive outlook.

Well, on January 9 she ended up in the hospital.

Long story short, she was diagnosed with “anxiety disorder” in 2001, and at the time it was determined a hormonal imbalance due to oral contraceptives was the cause. Ever since then she has had “anxiety” attacks and symptoms, which would occur out of the blue and for no reason: difficulty breathing, dizziness, tightness of the chest, racing heartbeats, skipped heartbeats…

In the days leading up to January 9, she had felt out of sorts. She would feel exhausted thoughout the day, despite a lot of sleep. She would wake up some mornings feeling as though she’d run a marathon all night, regardless she had slept 8-10 hours. Then she would experience palpitations that would leave her scared and in pain.

That particular day, though, she was feeling especially tired. Then every couple of hours she would have a heart palpitation. Around 4:00 that afternoon she was standing by the kitchen sink when she had an incredibly strong and painful heart palpitation that left her dizzy, nearly made her pass out, and left part of her vision gone. She lost her peripheral vision and her tunnel vision was extremely fuzzy. After about 15 minutes of this she called Papa ‘Skiy home from work and he took her to the hospital.

She’d never before experienced anything like this.

Mind you, Mama ‘Skiy had been to the hospital twice a year since 2013 because her palpitations had gotten worse and her breathlessness and near-fainting spells terrified her. However, every time she would get examined, she’d go through a series of tests that showed nothing was wrong and she would leave the hospital having been reprimanded for not taking anti-anxiety medication, especially since she’d had a history of “panic attacks,” which had to be the problem. After all, she was “too young” for there to be anything seriously wrong with her and a full cardiac workup in 2013, complete with a 24-hour holter monitor and an exercise stress test, showed her heart with just fine.

So we arrived at the ER and couldn’t find a parking space. None. Nothing at all. Frustrated and knowing the nurses and doctor would just send her home with a clean bill of health, Mama told Papa to just go home. We left and a few minutes later something told Mama we needed to go back to the hospital. So Papa turned around and this time we found a parking space.

She checked in at the ER counter and we waited in the waiting room…for an hour and a half. Her symptoms got worse and new ones appeared: muffled hearing, excruciating pain in the back between the shoulderblades, discomfort in her left jaw and arm… Papa grew impatient and kept asking for her to be seen.

When she was finally called back by the triage nurse, Mama did something she’d not done before when she went to the ER: she refrained from telling the staff about her “anxiety disorder.” Suddenly, everyone took her seriously. Nobody rolled their eyes at her or asked why she wasn’t on medication.

Soon after triage, she was taken to an exam room. She was changed into a hospital gown, examined, got a chest X-ray and was hooked up for a quick EKG, and had blood drawn. Mama and Papa were informed it would take a couple of hours before the results would arrive, so they decided Papa would take the boys home and they would wait there. We felt there was no reason for everyone to just sit around and wait. M ‘Skiy was heading for the exam room door, ready to leave, and D ‘Skiy was right behind him. Papa gave Mama a kiss and was holding her hand, when suddenly Mama felt odd…and then blacked out.

The machines started screaming.

Mama had flatlined. Her eyes were still open, but her heart had stopped.

Papa ran out of the room for help. Soon a tech started CPR on Mama, several nurses came to the room, and a crash cart was being wheeled in, nearly running the boys over.

After more than 12 seconds, Mama suddenly woke up. The defibrillator pads had been put on her but the machine had not been hooked up to her yet.

The first thing she saw was Papa’s panic-stricken face. Confused, she looked around and asked what had happened. Randomly, one of the many new faces in the room answered with, “You just earned yourself a pacemaker.”

She looked back at Papa and he explained what had taken place. She remembered holding his hand and feeling dizzy and nauseated, then she remembered her vision going black, and she also remembered hearing a bunch of noise before she could finally see again.

Her chest was also in a lot of pain, and when she commented on that the tech that had revived her said he had to perform CPR and the chest compressions resulted in the pain.

Soon, Papa was on the phone with Mama’s parents, explaining what had happened, and then Mama spoke to them, shaking uncontrollably and in tears.

She ended up getting more blood drawn and going through more tests. Then she was tranferred to ICU, mostly for observation.

Mama’s parents and brother made the three-hour trip across the state to see her and take care of our boys. There was no way to know how long she’d be hospitalized or what would happen next, so they wanted to be nearby and took care of the boys for the week.

The cardiologist on call that night ordered tests for any and every possible cause as to why her heart had stopped: proteins, Lyme disease, electrolyte imbalance, dehydration… Everything. Over the course of two days she had dozens of vials of blood taken.

After weighing every option, listening to multiple expert opinions, doing research, and every imaginable test result coming up negative, there was only a cardiac catheterization left to perform. We consented to either whatever surgery would be deemed necessary if the catherization showed a problem or a pacemaker implantation.

In the afternoon of January 11, Mama was taken to the OR for the cardiac catheterization. Everything looked fine: the structure of the heart was strong and healthy, there was no scar tissue or damage, and there were no blackages of any type. No heart surgery was necessary.

The only thing left was the implant of the pacemaker.

And fortunately, that went smoothly.

And it was at that point when the defibrillator pads she had received in the ER two days prior could finally be removed.

She spent the night in her ICU room recovering from the procedure. The next day she was transferred to a recovery room on another floor, and she was finally discharged the evening of January 12.

At 36 years old, just two months before turning 37 — which happens to be tomorrow — she received a pacemaker. And she’ll need one for the rest of her life.

It has taken her awhile to accept that she did not do and could not have done anything to cause or prevent this from happening. Her natural pacemaker — the sinoatrial node — no longer works properly. And the problem is congenital. She was born with it, did not receive it from her parents, and can’t pass it down to our sons. It was just a matter of time before it gave out.

It’s been a rough two months, recovering from the procedure altogether, needing to limit the use of her left arm for a month, and then using and exercising the arm again to regain her strength and full range of motion of the joint… It was especially difficult for her to depend on others for things we’d otherwise take for granted: getting dressed, showering, going to the bathroom…

Yes, it sucks. But it could be worse. She could not have listened to her body. Papa ‘Skiy could have not come home from work and taken her to the ER. She could have told the ER staff about her so-called “anxiety disorder,” resulting in them not taking her symptoms seriously. We could have been complacent and figured nothing to be wrong, because, after all, the medical experts had told her for years she was healthy, too young, and that it was all in her head.

This could have happened sometime during the cross-country three-month trip! Perhaps on the snowy trail high up in the mountains of Alaska, on the path in the evergreen forest in Washington, touring the isolated and wooded battlegrounds in Virginia.

It could have happened while she was driving our sons along the interstate or to a park in the town we live, causing a dangerous and potentially fatal automobile accident.

There are a lot of things that could have happened. But they didn’t. She was in the right place, at the right time.

So now she has a dual-chambered pacemaker that we’ve named Thumper Jumper, or TJ. He’s doing his job well, as she can feel him kick on every now and then. It’s been more than two months now and she hasn’t felt this well in years. Not weeks, not months; years! Lo and behold, her “anxiety” symptoms were actually early warning signs of her problem with the sinoatrial node. It was just easier — and made more sense — to diagnose her with anxiety disorder, when in reality she has what’s known as Sick Sinus Syndrome, or SSS.

Listen to your body. Pay close attention to how you feel and what that little voice inside your head tells you.

Medical professionals may be just that, but it is called the “practice of medicine” for a reason. And it doesn’t matter how long they went to school for or have practiced in their field. Nobody knows your body like you do.

After all, you’ve known and lived with it your entire life.

New Year, New Adventures?

It’s a new year!

We don’t believe in resolutions. Those are nearly a setup for failure.

We don’t believe in making sudden or drastic life changes overnight. Yes, it’s a new year, but it’s still just a single day.

We do believe in reflection and setting goals though.

The past year was rough. We lost another friend to cancer. Some family members aren’t taking the best care of themselves, no matter how poorly they’ve been treated or what has happened to them; they just won’t learn.

It’s been a year of emotions.

But a lot of good came out of the year too. We got a new-to-us truck and a new — and our first! — fifth wheel RV. We safely traveled the country and went places we’d only dreamed or read about. Both boys are now homeschooling and are still the best of friends.

Now we’re contemplating a major change over the course of this year…but that’s all we’re going to say about that right now.

Bottom line: live each day to the fullest, and remember that, in the end, you’ll regret the risks you didn’t take rather than those that you did.

Happy 2017! 

More To Do, Less To Hold

Two Christmases ago we were gifted a Disney annual pass by Papa ‘Skiy’s parents. The year 2015 was full of visits to the Orlando theme parks, and we had a blast.

When our passes expired, we chose not to renew them because it was too expensive and there were still things M ‘Skiy was still too small to do. Also, there were several things under construction that wouldn’t be completed until 2017 anyway. So we bought a Sea World annual pass for 2016 that included the waterpark Aquatica.

Sea World is nice, but the waterpark is amazing!

This year we decided to surprise the boys with Disney annual passes again. On Christmas morning, after they saw what Santa had brought and opened the few gifts we had gotten for them — mostly stuff for camping — they ventured out on a scavenger hunt that finally took them to an envelope with a paper inside informing them we would again be going to Disney in 2017.

This pass was different, though. Not only did it include the four main theme parks, but it also included the two Disney waterparks…and none of us had been to those yet!

So, yeah, many will think: “Whoopie! Disney! *Yawn*”

And honestly, we weren’t fans of theme parks ourselves.

But in 2015 our opinion of Disney changed. Expensive, yes. Crowded, quite often. But it’s additional family time spent together, and the service and treatment visitors receive are outstanding. You feel like a guest, not a customer.

In a period when the generation has become entitled and downright lazy, pacified with electronics, jam-packed extracurricular schedules, and “stuff,” we don’t mind theme park visits anymore. It’s another place to go and something else to do.

And we’ve always been more about experiences, not material things.

We do a lot and go many places together, and we’re not rushed or overwhelmed. We can’t slow down how quickly our boys are growing, but we can fill our days with memories and activities with them. Our shelves don’t hold trophies and our calendar isn’t jam-packed with this commitment and that event, and we’re okay with that because it doesn’t matter to them either.

We’re not rushing through life. After all, we’re not going to get out alive anyway, so what’s the point?

On those lazy mornings when they want to crawl into bed with us and just cuddle, we can do that.

On a random evening or weekend that we suddenly feel the urge to ride Expedition Everest, watch a fireworks show, or explore the tunnels on Tom Sawyer Island, we seldom need to worry about something on our calendar stopping us.

Expensive? Perhaps, but when you consider what we’re not spending in dues, fees, uniforms, and school supplies, there’s a good chance we’re still spending less than most.

And again, we’ve included our boys in these decisions, not made those choices for them. D ‘Skiy wanted to take Taek Won Do, so we signed him up. After he advanced to the next level, he asked if he could quit. He didn’t like being required to be someplace on certain days, at a certain time, and he didn’t like hitting. We didn’t push him and we didn’t sign him up for another month. M ‘Skiy enjoys playing tennis, and we’ve asked him if he’d like to take lessons or get on a league, but he said no, that he preferred just playing tennis with us, and that’s what we do.

As homeschoolers — well, unschoolers — our schedule is pretty relaxed. There are certain things Mama requires they do during the week because it’s required by the state, but we also take them to activities like a four-week-long Ninja Warrior obstacle training gym class and the annual Maker Faire Orlando, and we travel and camp a lot. These are things they enjoy and more we can do together as a family.

Many believe our sons should be on a more regular or tighter schedule. We disagree. They’re kids! Let them enjoy this care-free time of their lives. Halfway through their teen years their lives will become busier and more hectic. Fifteen years of actually being a child isn’t going to ruin them for life.

Kids are not little adults. They’re little people. What’s the point in over-scheduling? Why give them more stuff, just to toss it aside after a couple of weeks and forget about it?

Now, our kids have toys and their fair share of stuff. But these are things they love and play with almost daily: K’Nex, Hex, a Yamaha keyboard, popsicle sticks (yes, popsicle sticks), board games, rollerblades, archery supplies, tablets… And once we notice they stop playing with or they forget about something, we phase it out and donate it.

However, we much prefer going places and doing things, namely together.

Must Come To An End

On the evening of Friday, August 26, we set out on the adventure of a lifetime.

Well, it was a cross-country trip.

Okay, it was a three-month work-related field assignment for Papa ‘Skiy and everbody tagged along.

But it’s something none of us were ready to return home from and something we’d all jump at the chance to do again.

We returned home late on November 18, which was also Papa ‘Skiy’s 43rd birthday, but not before spending a couple of days with his parents in Fort Myers to celebrate with them as well.

Once we’d returned home, we looked at the final numbers that we put on both our truck and our fifth wheel: 12,100 miles and 8,079 miles, respectively. Our truck was our mode of transportation for work, sight-seeing, to and from airports, and errands, in addition to pulling our home across the country.

Our only problem was discovered as we were heading home after visiting Papa ‘Skiy’s parents, which were the final 200 miles of our journey. Before our trip we upgraded the tires and rims of our fifth wheel, and apparently the company that sold us the rims inadvertently suggested rims that were too weak for our RV. As a result, every single rim was cracking, two of them to the point the cracks went completely through the rims.

We limped home slowly but safely.

Other than that, we never had a tire blowout, mechanical or structural problem, or disappointing campground experience. Not one. Surprisingly enough, we were never tardy to one of Papa ‘Skiy’s assignments either. Even when we had to drive from Colorado to Virginia in only two days! Papa and M ‘Skiy did end up with a cold after our flight to and from Washington, and Mama and M ‘Skiy did have an ER visit each (Mama fell on her shoulder bike riding in Indiana and we were concerned she tore something, and M ‘Skiy cracked his head open sledding on snow in Alaska and required staples) but untimately everyone is fine and in excellent health.

If someone would have told us those three months were going to go nearly flawlessly, we wouldn’t have believed them.

Now it’s back to everyday life again.

We thought we’d be homesick. We thought we’d be anxious to return home. After all, our house is more than 2,100 square feet and our rig isn’t even 285 square feet.

But we weren’t.

It will be great to catch up with friends, stretch out a little, and use a larger and faster washer and dryer again.

However, we’d be lying if we said we’re not already longing for another extended road trip again.

Cabbage Key

Our final, final stop before heading home was to Fort Myers to see Papa’s parents. It gave us a chance to see them after being away for three months as well as celebrate Papa’s birthday…which is today!

On the evening of the 16th we set up our rig at San Carlos RV Resort, a campground we’ve been to before and loved and is probably the most-convenient and affordable family-friendly RV park in the area. The next day we met Mama’s in-laws at the dock on Captiva Island to board a boat bound for Cabbage Key. The boat ride was long and slow, but we were kept entertained by the many dolphins that followed alongside as we floated across the water.

Once we arrived to the island we dined at the only restaurant there (Cabbage Key Inn and Restaurant), walked the sandy paths, and climbed the water tower for a view of the area. The entire area was very pretty.

Earlier today — Papa’s birthday! — we checked out from the RV park and met Papa’s parents at the local Bass Pro to have a delicious lunch at Islamorada Fish Company.

It was a nice brief visit with his parents and he had a nice birthday…

…but now we’re actually heading home.